Carbohydrate-Protein and cycling performance

28 Sep

We’ve featured several studies on sports drinks and beverages, and it’s common knowledge that a lot of studies offer conflicting results. Such is the world of sports medicine. Depending on the design of the study, the recommendations of some studies would differ greatly from other supposedly similar studies. In the topic of sports beverages, there is still no consensus among experts as to the ideal choice to improve cycling performance. What we have instead are conflicting studies.

Just this June of 2010, a study published in the Medicine and Science in sports and exercise journal aimed to determine whether adding protein to a CHO beverage would improve late-exercise cycle time-trial performance over CHO alone. Furthermore, the study examined the effects of coingesting protein with CHO during exercise on postexercise markers of sarcolemmal disruption and the recovery of muscle function.

In a double-blind, crossover design, 12 trained male cyclists performed 120 min of steady-state (SS) cycling at approximately 55% VO2max followed by a time trial lasting approximately 1 h. At 15-min intervals during SS exercise, participants consumed either a CHO or a CHO + protein (CHO + Pro) beverage (providing 65 g x h(-1) CHO or 65 g x h(-1) CHO plus 19 g x h(-1) protein). Twenty-four hours after the onset of the SS cycle, participants completed a maximum isometric strength test. At rest and 24 h postexercise, a visual analog scale was used to determine lower-limb muscle soreness, and blood samples were obtained for plasma creatine kinase concentration. Dietary control was implemented 24 h before and during the time course of each trial.

Average power output sustained during time trial was similar for CHO and CHO + Pro, with no effect of treatment on the time to complete the time trial (60:13 +/- 1:33 and 60:51 +/- 2:40 (min:s) for CHO and CHO + Pro, respectively). Postexercise isometric strength significantly declined for CHO (15% +/- 3%) and CHO + Pro (11% +/- 3%) compared with baseline (486 +/- 28 N). Plasma creatine kinase concentrations, and visual analog scale soreness significantly increased at 24 h postexercise, with no difference between treatments.

The present findings suggest that CHO + Pro coingestion during exercise does not improve late-exercise time-trial performance, ameliorate markers of sarcolemmal disruption, or enhance the recovery of muscle function at 24 h postexercise over CHO alone.

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